Past Awardees

2016 AWARDEES

Academic Senate

Edward Callahan, Associate Dean Academic Personnel, UCDHS: Medical Dean's Office

  • Dr. Callahan has over 30 years of service at UC Davis and the UC Davis Health System. He was appointed as a faculty member in the Department of Family and Community Medicine in 1985 and as Associate Dean of Academic Personnel in the School of Medicine in 2006.
  • Dr. Callahan has embodied the UC Davis Principles of Community throughout his many years of work and in all of his roles. He leads passionately with the goal of reducing health disparities faced by the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex (LGBTQI) community.
  • Most recently, he formed the Task Force for Inclusion of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in the Electronic Health Record. This Task Force brought LGBTQI and ally faculty, staff, and students together to improve the patient health outcomes, and spawned other projects: a policy audit to make Medical Center policies more inclusive of LGBTQI patients; staff ally ship trainings; and the development of an LGBTQI-Welcoming Provider list.
  • This work has led to the UC Davis Medical Center being recognized as a "Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality" by the Human Rights Campaign Healthcare Equality Index for five consecutive years.  
  • He has also taken responsibility for extending knowledge of LGBTQI patient care by developing the Improving Outcomes Conference in 2015. In its inaugural year, the two-day conference brought 125 healthcare professionals from all over California to learn about culturally competent care for LGBTQI patients.
  • Dr. Callahan has also contributed to the development of LGBTQI curriculum in the School of Medicine alongside Dr. Hendry Ton. He was instrumental in developing a curriculum retreat comprised of health care educators, LGBTQI advocates, and students to plan a 4-year longitudinal curriculum, one of the first in the country.
  • Dr. Callahan then helped to inspire, recruit, and mentor faculty to teach in this curriculum, while also teaching directly to students from the Schools of Medicine and Nursing on this critical topic. Two years after the retreat, over 70% of the desired learning objectives were implemented which is a testament to Dr. Callahan’s collaborative leadership.
  • Dr. Callahan is a trusted and well-respected leader who strives to maintain a climate of equity and justice for all.

Academic Federation

Kupiri Ackerman-Barger, Assistant Adjunct Professor, UCDHS: Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing

  • Dr. Ackerman-Barger Assistant Adjunct Professor and Assistant Director for the Master's Entry Program for the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing.  In that capacity, she has advocated for the development of a holistic admissions process to ensure the cognitive diversity of the cohort of students admitted. This involved leading colleagues in a collaborative effort to develop a mission statement for the Admissions Committee that identifies the School's commitment to diversity and inclusion. She also worked with the Admission Committee Chair to develop strategies for recruitment of a diverse pool of students.
  • Additionally, Dr. Ackerman-Barger has represented the School at the National Black Nurses Association and the National Hispanic Nurses Association meetings in order to generate enthusiasm among the attendees for our graduate programs.
  • Dr. Ackerman-Barger also serves on several UC Davis Health System committees related to diversity and inclusion, including Under-Represented Groups in Medicine & Biomedical Science where she served on the Faculty Toolkit Subcommittee and the Networking Event Subcommittee. Dr. Ackerman-Barger's contributions and insights regarding diversity are reflected in her appointment to several important university search committees: Associate Dean of Faculty Development & Diversity and Director of Institutional Climate and Community Engagement.
  • Dr. Ackerman-Barger is developing an important area of scholarship on the topic of "stereotype threat susceptibility" among underrepresented minority students. Stereotype threat occurs when a person's social identity is attached to a negative stereotype. In the case of students of color, those susceptible to stereotype threat will tend to underperform in a manner consistent with that negative stereotype. She has received intramural funding to support her research. Dr. Ackerman-Barger presented this research at the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity (NCORE) in 2015.
  • Dr. Ackerman-Barger also volunteers as a facilitator of the Team Peace Curriculum Committee. Team PEACE (Professionalism, Ethics and Cultural Enrichment) is a four-year curriculum thread that prepares UC Davis medical students to uphold the tenets of health care professionalism, to work effectively in inter-professional teams and to provide culturally relevant and ethical care to all patients.
  • Team PEACE includes nursing, medicine and physician-assistant students who meet in seminar format to explore the sociocultural dimensions of health and illness while recognizing personal biases and reactions to persons from diverse backgrounds.
  • Dr. Ackerman-Barger works tirelessly to ensure that diversity and inclusion is integrated into all aspects of the health profession, including admissions, teaching, research and patient care.  

Graduate Student

Orlando Carreon, Associate-In, Student, Language, Literacy, and Culture, School of Education

  • Orlando's service to our campus in diversity, community, and social justice has been outstanding during his tenure here as a PhD student.
  • From the moment he arrived on campus, Orlando focused his School of Education activism on building community and transforming consciousness of faculty and students toward social justice. When School of Education (SOE) was caught up in incidents of inflammatory racist discourse among students it was clear that something had to change.
  • Orlando was one of a handful of students who stepped forward to try to make a difference.  He became one of the founders, and one of the leaders - of the student-created SOE Social Justice Education Committee. Supplied by the Office of Graduate Studies and the campus administration, this committee has since become the campus­ wide Social Justice Education Coalition (SJEC).
  • One of the early actions of the organization was to create a "Critical Consciousness Speaker Series," in which Orlando was again, a leader.  The Speaker Series has brought world-renowned scholars and educators to UC Davis to speak on issues of equity. Now in its fifth year, it draws audiences from all over the UCD campus.  The importance of this series for opening minds and educating the campus community about race, social justice, and transformation is great.
  • Orlando was also deeply involved in creating an advisory board for the SJEC that brings together influential UC Davis scholars and administrators, including the Director of the Office of Campus Community Relations, Graduate Studies Diversity Director, Campus Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Director of Research and Policy for Equity in SOE, Dean of SOE, and two senior faculty members in the SOE. 
  • The creation of this advisory board should not be minimized: the advisory board has not only provided valuable mentorship to both the student-led coalition, SOE administration and faculty, but it has also created a sustainable model of campus partnerships dedicated to equity, diversity, and social justice that embody the campus Principles of Community.
  • Orlando has also been an intensely involved participant of the Graduate Academic Achievement & Advocacy Program (GAAAP) mentorship project, which pairs graduate students with undergraduate students to demystify the graduate school experience and encourage more representation of students of color at the graduate school level.
  • He has worked with five under-represented students for the past two years, all of whom have now graduated and are currently applying for admission to graduate programs. Orlando is a remarkable teacher, student, scholar, and educational leader committed to social change in education.

Undergraduate Student

Juli Apte, Junior, Services for International Students & Scholars, Global Affairs

  • Jui Apte is a wonderful student leader, as well as an ambassador of diversity and inclusion for UC Davis.  Jui has played a crucial in the success of the Global Ambassadors Mentorship Program. Her enthusiasm for assisting international students in their academic journey is grounded in her personal experience. 
  • Jui understands how it feels to be suddenly immersed in a new culture.  She knows the struggle of being far from home and trying to build relationships while navigating through the complexity of the University system.
  • Jui found those connections in the Global Ambassadors Program where she has attended all of the workshops, and served as a volunteer.  She also encouraged other students to get involved.  
  • As a mentor Jui goes above and beyond to provide guidance and support to her fellow international students, especially in times of distress. 
  • Jui is also instrumental in the Global Ambassadors Program operations where she assists in organizing events and marketing programs. 
  • Administrators acknowledge that without Jui's help, the program would not have exhibited the organization and inclusion that it does today. Jui is a true ambassador of diversity and inclusion.

Staff

Cara Harwood Theisen, Educational Specialist, Center for Educational Effectiveness

  • Dr. Theisen is the Teaching Assistant (TA) Consultant Coordinator at the Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE).  Cara is her dedication to raising awareness among UC Davis faculty and instructors about effective teaching and learning practices that support student diversity and inclusivity in the classroom. In winter 2015, under Cara's guidance, the TA consultants created a workshop series for graduate instructors titled, "Student, Classroom, and Instructor: Strategies for Aligning Teaching with Learning."
  • During our planning, Cara pushed TA’s to think collectively and collaboratively about how to encourage other graduate instructors to reflect on diversity and what strategies may be employed to help students to be successful in the classroom.
  • This motivated the TA’s to develop workshop ideas that covered topics such as educational equity, various modes of participation across disciplines, and Universal Design for Learning (UDL).
  • This past summer, Cara and Amanda O’dell co-wrote the TA's Guide to Effective Teaching at UC Davis. Due to her ongoing commitment to ensuring that TAs are aware that student diversity extends beyond statistics, they wrote a chapter dedicated to illustrating who students are at UC Davis, the benefits of engagement for student learning and retention, and approaches for supporting first-generation, and other college students.
  • Dr. Theisen has also developed and implemented outreach and hiring practices for the TAs that will encourage a more diverse applicant pool and more transparent application and interview evaluations.
  • Under Dr. Theisen's leadership, program outreach materials  now reflect the team's commitment to  cultural competence and the principles of community; program outreach is focused on diverse graduate student populations in a concerted effort to diversify the applicant  pool;  the application process now includes a diversity statement; the application review process is now governed by a rubric to help reduce implicit bias; and the interview protocol now includes questions about inclusive education and cultural humility.
  • Dr. Theisen's practices have far-reaching implications for campus climate and beyond as she continues the efforts of building a more diverse and inclusive campus community.

Honorary Service

Griselda Castro, Deputy Director, Office of the Provost

  • Griselda Castro retired Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs.  
  • After retirement, Griselda led the effort in completing the promise of the 2007 AGR Room Reconciliation Proposal, a project that has its roots in the fall of 1975 upon discovery of the “Lupe” song, a fraternity pledge song that graphically describes the sexual exploits of a Mexican woman.
  • In her role as Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs and after her retirement, Griselda was a tireless champion to see this project through. She has been instrumental in engaging the Chicano/Latino Community and greater campus community in working together for a path forward that brings some restorative resolution to the events of 1975.
  • Griselda was instrumental in shepherding the major components of the AGR Room Reconciliation Proposal: establishment of the “Lupe Social Justice Scholarship Fund” and the creation of a major public-outdoor art piece to be placed at the Buehler Alumni Center.
  • With the scholarship fund being established in 2007-2008, Griselda was recalled from retirement to complete the last component of the reconciliation proposal. 
  • In the last year, she has led the effort in the creation of the art piece, working with the identified artist and consulting with various constituencies on the concept of the sculpture so that it will symbolize both its premise and promise of healing while honoring the respectful role of Mexican women in our state and society at large.
  • After numerous consultations, bringing campus community members together to take ownership of the reflective and educational power of “The Voice of Lupe,” the public sculpture was formally dedicated on November 12, 2015 to an audience that values the power of community coming together in our collective efforts to move forward.
  • Since the drafting of the reconciliation proposal, it was Griselda's leadership that guided the promise of the proposal while serving as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and completing that promise after her retirement. 
  • As a staff member, Griselda has been an important champion for diversity and inclusion. Even in her retirement, her commitment to the power of UC Davis as an institution for changing hearts and minds is illustrated in her commitment to seeing this important project to completion
2015 AWARDEES

Academic Senate

Tonya Fancher, Physican, UCDHS: Division of General Medicine

  • Dr. Fancher has worked tirelessly to address disparities among minority groups by implementing several community-based teaching programs focusing on the care of vulnerable populations. For example, she led the Transforming Education and Community Health residency program (TEACH), which is a primary care teaching partnership with the Sacramento County clinic. The program trains Internal Medicine residents to provide culturally competent care in medically underserved communities of California and beyond.
  • She started a similar program in the School of Medicine called TEACH- Medical Students attracting students from diverse backgrounds to become primary care physician leaders in urban underserved communities.
  • Dr. Fancher also helped launch the San Joaquin Valley PRIME Program in 2011 and serves as its Associate Director for Curriculum. This program provides students with first-hand experience with interdisciplinary health care in medically underserved communities, as well as a curriculum emphasizing a true understanding of the factors and conditions impacting quality of health care in the Central Valley.

Academic Federation

Carol Hom, IGERT/Academic Coordinator, Department of Evolution and Ecology, College of Biological Sciences

  • Dr. Hom has been the Academic Coordinator for three major NSF Programs, Biolnvasions, REACH and the NSF- IGERT funded Collaborative Learning at the Interface of Mathematics and Biology (CLIMB) undergraduate training program.  
  • For each of these programs Dr. Hom collaborates with faculty, students and staff from multiple departments and her personal leadership functions include, coordinator, mentor, instructor, and project manager. 
  • Dr. Hom is instrumental in the documented achievements of these highly interdisciplinary and challenging programs that have served students from the broadest spectrum of academic, social, and cultural backgrounds.
  • The BioInvasions, REACH, and CLIMB programs were all extremely successful, in promoting diversity and career placement. The REACH IGERT trained 21 graduate students total, including 12 women and 2 students from underrepresented groups in the STEM fields; and the for the NSF IGERT program she trained 19 students, including 9 women and 2 Latinos.

Judith Kjelstrom, Director, Biotechnology Program, Molecular and Cellular Biology

  • Dr. Kjelstrom is a lecturer for the department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, and has severed as the lecturer at several university and college institutions. She is on the board for several local organizations and participates in numerous outreach projects.
  • She is the Co-PI for a joint NSF project at American River College that focuses on  Applied Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Training for High School Teachers.  She is also the co- Founder and member of Advisory Board for BioTech SYSTEM, a regional biotech consortium.
  • Dr. Kjelstrom is a champion of women issues and she strives to promote equity for women in all walks of life. 
  • Dr. Kjelstrom not only organizes programs, she encourages her students to seek positions within the community that serve elementary and middle school children.  She stresses to her students the importance of planting seeds in the minds of young people, so they will be excited about seeking careers in the STEM fields. 

Post-doc Fellow

Amandeep Kaur, Fellow, Chancellor & Provost Office

  • Amandeep Kaur, is a Chancellor's Science Fellow. She is a trailblazer whose many efforts to foster diversity and inclusion have inspired administrators, faculty staff and students.
  • Amandeep spearheaded a campaign to address the issue of Non Resident Supplemental Tuition (NRST) for international PhD students. Her relentless advocacy and passion to create equity for international students resulted in creation of new RST fellowships.
  • Last year as Graduate Ally Coalition Coordinator to improve campus climate she initiated the Diversity Dialogues on Graduate Education.    To understand the needs of various student communities, such as undocumented, international, LGBTQIA, Student veterans, students of color, graduate student parents and women in STEM, she conducted surveys of each student population.  Her survey findings uncovered critical issues that needed to be address.  The dialogues facilitated community building and helped to improve campus climate.

Marcus Tang, AB540 Center, Law School

  • Marcus Tang is the human embodiment of this Award. He is currently the AB540 Post Graduate Legal Fellow at UC Davis, where he works with the new AB540 Center by consulting with staff, offering presentations, training, legal services, and information and also represents clients at UC Davis Immigration Law Clinic.
  • As a law student, he worked as a student legal advocate with the UC Davis School of Law Immigration Law Clinic, as a summer law clerk with Legal Services of Northern California and with Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach, and as a judicial extern for Alameda County Superior Court Judge Delbert C. Gee, among other roles.
  • However, he is best known for his work with the UC Davis and King Hall community.  He organizes and collaborates with students and faculty to address urgent and important issues affecting low-income, marginalized, and people of color communities. 
  • During his time at King Hall, Marcus was involved in ensuring that the Legal Repayment Assistance Program would be held strongly in place for current students and alumni, working with immigrant and undocumented communities.
  • Most importantly, all organizations and students knew Marcus as a tireless, kind, and empathetic advocate who worked for and with others, not himself.  

Graduate Student

Lauren Jabusch, Graduate Student Researcher, Biological & Ag Engineering, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

  • Lauren is engaged in sustainability efforts on and off campus. She was the leader in the California Student Sustainability Coalition and served as co-director of the Campus Center for the Environment and as a Sustainability Intern for Student Housing.
  • She coordinated workshops for the campus on several topics in the area of sustainability including Climate Issues, Energy Efficiency/Alternative Energy, Equity, Food Systems and Agriculture, Green Building, Campus Operations and Green Housing, Greening Your Career, Institutionalizing Sustainability, and Social equity.
  • Lauren has continued her sustainability efforts with the California Student Sustainability Coalition (CSSC) as the Chairperson of the Board of Directors and with the campus, as a committee member on the College of Engineering, Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering's Safety Committee.
  • Laruen is currently in her second year as an NSF GK-12 Fellow with the Renewable Energy Systems Opportunity for Unified Research Collaboration and Education program (RESOURCE). The RESOURCE program leverages our campus commitment to energy research and partnerships with local Math and Engineering Science Achievement (MESA) programs that elementary and middle schools work with to develop and demonstrate a reproducible model for Graduate and K-12 research and teaching partnerships.

Undergraduate Student

Ana Maciel, Junior, Chicano Studies, College of Letters and Science

  • Ana Maciel is an outstanding student leader, as well as an ambassador of diversity and inclusion for UC Davis.  Ana is a well-respected student leader for immigration reform on our campus, in the City of Davis, and throughout the state. She is a strong advocate of social justice and human rights as demonstrated by her leadership in the creation of the AB.540 Undocumented Student Center, a new resource center for undocumented students at UC Davis.
  • Ana has worked tirelessly on behalf of undocumented students and their families to create awareness of their issues, and to organize resources to support their educational goals.
  • She has been involved in the UC Davis student organization, SPEAK (Scholars Noting Education, Awareness and Knowledge) which has been instrumental in providing peer initiated support services for undocumented students prior to the establishment of the center.
  • This year she is the acting co-chair and the only undergraduate student representative appointed to the University of California, President's Advisory Council on Undocumented Students.   

Staff

Nathan Ellstrand, Office Coordinator, Cross Cultural Center

  • Nathan Ellstrand has lived in Davis for a short three years.   In    that time he has firmly established himself as   the social justice hub of not only the campus but the city of Davis.
  • His passion and commitment to equity are driven by the axiom that words without action are dead. All ideas that cross his path become action items.
  • Nathan campus contributions include his outstanding work on Staff Assembly where he has been instrumental in outreach efforts to increase membership.  As an advisor to student organizations affiliated with the Cross Cultural Center, Nathan has championed successful programs that have brought together Middle Eastern/South Asia community with the Chicano/Latino Community Asian American Community and the Undocumented student community.
  • He is the heartbeat of the Cross Cultural Center and the campus greatly benefits from his authentic relationships with so many members of the campus community and genuine support for advancing excellence in inclusion, affirmation, validation and celebration of the great diversity at UC Davis.  

Community Member

Sandy Lynne Holman, Business Community, The Culture C.O-O.P. and United in Unity, Davis

  • She is the Director of an organization called The Culture C.O.-O.P., and United in Unity, which focus on promoting respect for equity, diversity, cultural competency, and  quality education for all.  
  • Some of her achievements include mentoring scores of youth who come from vulnerable populations and helping them realize their potential, and to have hope for a better future
  • Ms. Holman was pivotal in writing a grant and starting the "Mentor Life Skills Center, "in Yolo County which created a collaborative to recruit, train, and match adults with youth facing an array of challenges.
  • She instituted a National campaign called " WE All Have A Heritage, "which focuses on anti-bullying efforts, respect for diversity/differences, reading and the importance of literacy, and a quality education for all.
  • Ms. Holman continually produces educational materials such as books, papers, guides and commentary, to educate people and promote respect for different cultural groups. 
  • She also helped to create one of the largest International Festivals in Davis, which bought together up to 4000 people in its third year.  

 

 
 
2014 AWARDEES

Academic Senate

Barbara Horwitz, Distinguished Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Behavior

  • Advancing a more diverse and principled academic community
  • Maximizing Student Diversity/Development (IMSD) for the past 13 years
  • Mentored underrepresented minority students in the graduate program to completion of their PhD's
  • Mentored Fellows in progress to their PhD's
  • Mentored Juniors and Senior underrepresented honor students headed for research careers in biomedical areas
  • Strengthened existing programs that promote faculty diversity and advancement including the Partner Opportunity Program (POP), for dual couple hires; and the family-oriented "work-life" programs (including accommodation for child bearing/child leaving)
  • Instrumental in receiving a $250,000 Alfred P. Sloan Award in 2006 to expand programs that support career flexibility for tenured and tenure-track faculty

Academic Federation

Suzanne Eidson-Ton, M.D., M.S., Family and Community Medicine

  • Actively promoted, designed, and taught cultural competence curricula for the students in the schools of medicine and nursing, readying the new generations of health care providers to care for culturally diverse communties.
  • As Director of Rural-PRIME, a UC initiative dedicated to improving medical services to underserved communities, has been an instrumental driver in recruiting and training diverse and community-oriented students who go on to practice in regions where threre are physician shortages.
  • As an advocate of underserved communities, Dr. Eidson-Ton led efforts to reopen the Knights Landing Clinic that is run by Rural-PRIME students.  She has also contributed to medical students matching in primary care disciplines at a higher rate than the national average, which is vital given the shortage of primary care physicians.
  • Dr. Eidson-Ton has been instrumental in helping UC Davis Health System develop systems for sensitively soliciting sexual orientation and gender identity information to improve care for lisbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients.

Post-doc

Dr. Carolina Balazs, Environmental Justice and Drinking Water in California

  • Regional planning to address dringking water impacts in environmental justice and environmental justice for communities;
  • Cumulative impacts of drinking water and health;
  • Water system capacity and sustainability;
  • Structural analysis of disproportionate drinking water burdens.
  • Published articles on nitrate contamination of drinking water in the San Joaquin Valley
  • A strong advocate forlow income Latino communities in the Central Valley where some of California's most egregious water violations are found
  • Her research and engagement have already made important contributions to solving these crucial environmental justice issues, and advancing knowledge about the social, economic, political, and technical variables that influence environmental justice outcomes.

Graduate Student

Cristian Heredia, Electrical and Computer Engineering

  • As an underrepresented student in the STEM
  • EM field, he provides mentorship to other underrepresented students in STEM, acting as a translator, and served as a mentor to young male Latinos.
  • In the same role of Para Educator at Rio Linda Prep Academy he promoted STEM through science modules taught to 5th and 6th graders, as well as fostered team building and leadership in students through weekly science activities.
  • As a National Science Foundation Fellow he teaches science modules to 5th graders in traditionally underserved schools, as well as help with after school programs.
  • Christian's long-term vision is to deploy low-cost solar harvesting technology to developing countries in hopes of providing an alternative to fossil fuel dependency.

Undergraduate Student

Kriti Garg, Letters and Science Dean's Office

  • An outstanding student leader, an ambassador of diversity and inclusion for UC Davis.
  • Her internship at the Cross-Cultural Center, Kriti has forged relationships with students across all social and cultural identifies.
  • Served as lead coordinator for the Students of Color Conference UC Davis delegation, and she was instrumental in recruiting 95 students to travel to the UCLA conference last November.  At the conference, she led a workship on how to build a peer led diversity and social justice program that can be duplicated at any campus.
  • Kriti is also the ASUCD Chair of the Ethnic and Cultural Affairs Commission where she leads a committee of 10 students in advancing programs and policies that impact diversity and inclusion.  In January 2014, she was the Co-coordinator of the 14th Annual Reaffirming Ethnic Awareness and Community Harmony Retreat (REACH).
  • Her passion for social justice is infectious and inspires many of her peers to join movements or participate in projects to advance equity and inclusion.

 Staff

Tanya Whitlow, Engineering Dean's Office

  • Tanya's role at the LEADR Student Center is to establish and improve retention of students historically underrepresented in engineering and to increase diversity in the college.
  • She has helped to raise over $200,000 to assist in serving underrepresented students in engineering
  • She is involved with the Special Transition Enrichment Program (STEP).  STEP is a campus-based program designed to recruit and retain underrepresented students.  Funds raised by Tanya have been applied toward supporting additional students in STEP.  She has partnered with the advisers in the dean's office to provide summer advising and mandatory quarterly advising for all STEP students.  Of the 34 engineering students who participated in STEP, 32 have been retained in engineering.  This is remarkable considering the overall retention rate of freshmen in engineering is close to 50%.

Community Member                   

Georgia West, Underground Books, Sacramento

  • Underground Books has helped the campus strengthen its relationship with the Sacramento community at large and the Oak Park community in particular.  Oak Park is a historically African-American community in Sacramento whose residents have not always felt UC Davis was within their reach in terms of admission opportunities and community educational programming.
  • Playing a pivotal role through co-sponsorship of several Campus Community Book Project events over the last several years.  Featured books have brought dialogue about race relations, racial identity development and the educational achievement gap between the races. 
  • The bond between the UC Davis campus and the Oak Park community has been greatly strengthened by the collaborative work, support and co-sponsorship of the CCBP by Underground Books.  This partnership has planted a seed that will provide a pathway for Oak Park students and their families to deepen their connection to the University facilitating the goal of increasing the enrollment of African American Students.